James Raymo

Position
Henry Wendt III ’55 Professor of East Asian Studies
Role
Professor of Sociology
Title
Director, Princeton University - University of Tokyo Strategic Partnership
Phone
Office
183 Wallace Hall
Degrees

Ph.D Sociology
University of Michigan, 2000

Advisee(s):
Bio/Description

Jim Raymo is Professor of Sociology and the Henry Wendt III Professor of East Asian Studies at Princeton University. Raymo is a social demographer whose research focuses on documenting and understanding the causes and potential consequences of demographic changes associated with population aging in Japan. His published research includes analyses of marriage timing, divorce, recession and fertility, marriage and women’s health, single mothers’ well-being, living alone, family change and social inequality, employment and health at older ages, and regional differences in health at older ages. He is currently engaged in three projects: In the first, he uses newly-available survey data to examine the socioeconomic and family correlates of children’s academic performance, personal relationships, and emotional health. This is a collaborative project involving scholars addressing similar questions in China and Korea. In the second project, he is examining the social, cultural, economic, and policy factors underlying striking demographic similarities among countries in East Asia and Southern Europe, with a particular focus on the roles of gender inequality, family ties, and growing unpredictability of the life course. He is chairing a scientific panel on this subject sponsored by the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population. In the third project, he is working with colleagues in Japan to document the well-being of single mothers and their children and to understand the ways in which intergenerational coresidence and intrafamilial exchanges of support may (or may not) offset some of the disadvantages faced by unmarried mothers. 

Selected Publications

Raymo, James M., Fumiya Uchikoshi, and Shohei Yoda. 2021. “Marriage Intentions, Desires, and Pathways to Later and Less Marriage in Japan.” Demographic Research 44: 67–98.

 

Halpern-Manners, Andrew, James M. Raymo, John R. Warren, and Kaitlin Johnson. 2020. “School Performance and Mortality: The Role of Work and Family Trajectories Across the Life Course” Advances in Life Course Research 46.

 

Wang, Jia and James M. Raymo. 2020.“Non-standard Employment and Life Satisfaction in Japan” forthcoming in Journal of Marriage and Family.

 

Fukuda, Setsuya, James M. Raymo, and Shohei Yoda. 2020. “Revisiting the Educational Gradient in Women’s Marriage in Japan” Journal of Marriage and Family 82: 1378–1396.

 

Wang, Jia and James M. Raymo. 2020. “Household income and child well-being in Japan: The role of grandparental coresidence and residential proximity.” Chinese Journal of Sociology 6: 286-314.

 

Raymo, James M. and Hyunjoon Park. 2019. “Marriage Trends in Korea: Changing Composition of the Domestic Marriage Market and Growth in International Marriage” Demography 57: 171–194.

 

Raymo, James M., Isabel Pike, and Jersey Liang. 2019.“A New Look at the Living Arrangements of Older Americans using Multistate Life Tables.” Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences 74: e84–e96.